Conservation and Caring for Community a Collective Responsibility

Mordi Creek 2019.jpg

I’ve lived in Mordialloc for 35 years and like many living bayside I’m forever conscious of the fragility of our environment: erosion of cliffs and sand dunes, the need for the perpetual replacement of sand on some of the beaches, the close proximity of the water table and propensity to flood, importance of the wetlands for bird migration and propagation, history of the swamps and flooding in certain areas, the risk of pollution to Mordialloc Creek…

I’m also aware and proud, of the beauty we can access every day – losing count of how many sensational sunsets admired while sitting on the beach or walking along the foreshore.

sunset at Mordialloc

The glorious walks along Mordialloc Creek alone, or with Jillian, my current walking buddy, or walking the family dog, Josie with one of my daughters. You never know what or who you will encounter.

ducks crossing mordi creek.jpg

I love strolling through Attenborough Park showing visitors the Indigenous plants, the boats moored on Mordialloc Creek and then wandering up and down the pier checking what fish are biting – or not – whether it is a good day for sailing – before finishing the tour enjoying a cuppa in one of the many cafes in Mordialloc and Parkdale.

Memories of sitting on Doyles’ deck abound – sipping a cider or cup of tea, revelling in the happy noises of chatter and laughter, birds twittering, ducks quacking, boat engines chugging and the steady drone of cars powering to work or home.

To live in such a peaceful community a blessing, especially surrounded by so much natural beauty. However, peace, tranquillity and beauty do not ‘just happen’ in urban areas because for every park, waterway or wetland there are friends’ groups and volunteers working hard to preserve the natural environment, forever vigilant against threats and encroachment.

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Mordialloc Beaumaris Conservation League Caring for 50 years!

The reason we have so much natural space and loveliness to enjoy in Kingston is that there are those within the community ever ready to defend the environment – even if that means public demonstrations, court challenges to the council and state government proposals and decisions, or campaigns of awareness that something of value is under threat.

invite to conservation league 50th copy

One such group is the Mordialloc Beaumaris Conservation League and at the end of September, I attended a low-key celebration of their 50th Anniversary.

This community group of volunteers dedicate their time to protecting and promoting the wonderful coastline of the Bayside suburbs and also monitoring the environment of Mordialloc Creek.

A name that continually pops up in regard to the group is Mary Rimington AM, who with her husband and children and a handful of stalwarts have done an outstanding job over the years, ensuring the group not only continues but achieves many successes.

Mary has been the secretary of MBCL for 30 years and is the keeper of archives – being a local school librarian  BC (before children) her training and attention to detail a wonderful asset.

Research and accurate record-keeping and a passion for the environment have helped Mary be an inveterate writer to the newspapers. Her published letters in the local paper and The Age always demonstrate knowledge and field experience. Likewise the numerous submissions to government bodies and enquiries.

mary rimington speaking

There was a board display at the celebration but also bundles of leaflets and material on shelves, which were full of remarkably rich historical information. I’m grateful to another active member of the group, Nina Earl for this summary:

  • the first AGM in 1969 and documentation and outcomes of other meetings
  • campaigns against a Bay Gas Pipeline and later channel deepening to retain the natural coastline and Mordialloc Creek
  • Copies of submissions, letters, maps, photographs, paintings
  • flyers on the long-running campaign for the Bay Trail,
  • three versions of brochures of Coast and Creek walks – the latest one used in local secondary colleges
  • the 2019 submission on the Mordialloc Freeway Environmental Effects Statement
  • the draft concept for the long-awaited Sandbelt Open Space Chain of Parks and Trails first proposed in 1984 and long supported by MBCL and still current.

The contrast between the booklets published previously and the latest one, more to do with cost and availability of technology than the information provided.

Although, there is no contest as to what booklet will appeal to young people and hopefully, encourage them to read and explore the local environment. The latest edition is stunning!

Here are selections from each to compare:

 

Mary’s son, Lew, the Treasurer for MBCL shared some firsthand memories of the various campaigns since his school days and how he and his siblings were often called in at short notice to be ‘in the picture’ if media showed interest in a campaign and a photographer turned up – his mother always media savvy!

The Hon. Clifford Hayes MLC Southern Metro and his Chief of Staff, Kelvin Thompson (an ex-MP) were invited guests and Clifford Hayes thanked the group, especially Mary and her family for their conservation work and keeping so many important and necessary campaigns in the public eye.

He promised to continue to advocate for the environment.

Passionate and dedicated community groups are the best watchdogs for the environment and to check that government projects do good, not harm and Kingston is lucky to have several active groups.

Mary spoke about some of the highs and lows of MBCL’s history – not every campaign was successful and some were more memorable than others. She commended the commitment and activism of Professor Michael Buxton and Peter Scullin who were unafraid of taking on the establishment and challenging the law.

I nominated Mary to be a co-speaker when I was asked to present at IWD 2016 because I was Kingston Citizen of the Year.  When she was awarded the Kingston Citizen of the Year in 2017, I was thrilled her remarkable community service and devotion to all things environmental was recognised!

mary rimington and me 2017

I have a deep respect for all that MBCL have achieved and know Mary is the devoted lynchpin of the group, even when some of the campaigns have been controversial or far from popular.  I’ve lived in Mordialloc for 35 years and have seen the improvements to the foreshore, the Creek, the Wetlands – all areas championed by  MBCL.

Other community groups have also been active for many years with a few prominent in the 80s and 90s when the council responded to their concerns and we are reaping the benefits today.

I became involved with some of the groups and in campaigns to rein in developers and retain the ‘village atmosphere’ so many Mordialloc residents value.

Campaigning to retain the integrity of the Green Wedge an ongoing battle debated every year for almost the last decade!

kingston green wedge 2012.jpg

A climate catastrophe has been declared/recognised by many countries, at the same time Victoria has massive infrastructure projects and fast-paced housing developments, and in Mordialloc and surrounds we see evidence of this daily.

We need the diligence and courage of groups like MBCL to remind us of the value of our natural environment, of what we must conserve if we want to protect the habitat for countless flora and fauna facing extinction and to ensure our own health. 

Infrastructure and housing important for a growing population but how we manage the necessary development important for the survival of the natural environment because our health and wellbeing depend on that too!

Groups like the Mordialloc Beaumaris Conservation League remind us to value the natural world and inspire us to action to convince legislators to protect and provide a vision of what is necessary for future generations.

tree with lily.jpg

Establish a relationship with your surroundings, whether your garden, your street, or the wider community, value and protect the flora and fauna and we all reap the benefits.

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